Amphibious Warships that Honor the Sacrifices of September 11th
On the 13th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks, we remember the lives lost and the heroic response of the many who since have made great sacrifices to protect our freedom and security.
We commemorate three U.S. Navy LPD 17 San Antonio-class amphibious warships designed and built in honor of the heroes and victims of that day: 
USS New York (LPD 21) named to honor the heroes and victims of the attack on the World Trade Center, commissioned in November 2009; 
USS Arlington (LPD 24) named for the site of the attack on the Pentagon and honoring the first responders who rushed to rescue victims, commissioned in April 2012; and 
 USS Somerset (LPD 25) named in honor of the courageous passengers and crew of United Airlines Flight 93 and the site of the plane’s crash, commissioned in March 2013.

Read what the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert believes, “Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready” means to the commanders and crew of USS New York (LPD 21), USS Arlington (LPD 24), and USS Somerset (LPD 25): http://1.usa.gov/1smUQwT

Watch a video from the Smithsonian on USS New York (LPD 21). 

Amphibious Warships that Honor the Sacrifices of September 11th

On the 13th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks, we remember the lives lost and the heroic response of the many who since have made great sacrifices to protect our freedom and security.

We commemorate three U.S. Navy LPD 17 San Antonio-class amphibious warships designed and built in honor of the heroes and victims of that day: 

  • USS New York (LPD 21) named to honor the heroes and victims of the attack on the World Trade Center, commissioned in November 2009; 
  • USS Arlington (LPD 24) named for the site of the attack on the Pentagon and honoring the first responders who rushed to rescue victims, commissioned in April 2012; and 
  •  USS Somerset (LPD 25) named in honor of the courageous passengers and crew of United Airlines Flight 93 and the site of the plane’s crash, commissioned in March 2013.

Read what the Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Jonathan Greenert believes, “Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready” means to the commanders and crew of USS New York (LPD 21), USS Arlington (LPD 24), and USS Somerset (LPD 25): http://1.usa.gov/1smUQwT

Watch a video from the Smithsonian on USS New York (LPD 21)

U.S. Marines rely on the unique capabilities of U.S. Navy amphibious warships to help them carry out their mission in any type of condition and on short notice. The MV-22B Osprey aircraft embarked on U.S. Navy amphibious warships are a key element in executing a successful mission.

The MV-22B Osprey is a tiltrotor vertical take-off and landing (VSTOL) aircraft used to transport U.S. Marines, equipment, and supplies from amphibious warships to shore for the purpose of combat assault or humanitarian support.

The Osprey’s many capabilities allow it to carry out missions that helicopters physically cannot. The MV-22 has high-speed, long-range casualty-evacuation, aerial delivery and command and control capabilities and in coming years it is expected to be capable of aerial refueling.

The MV-22 cruises at more than 220 knots and can transport up to 24 troops more than 700 miles without refueling, allowing the aircraft to “make possible missions that were impossible before.” Due to its wide range of capabilities, the deployment rate for Marine Osprey squadrons is among the highest in the military.

Recently, the Pentagon positioned MV-22 Osprey troop transports in northern Iraq amid speculation that American forces could be used to help evacuate people threatened by Islamic militants.

Read more about the MV-22 Osprey here: http://1.usa.gov/1lCQKzC

Graphic source: Boeing

americasnavy:

Around the World Wednesday: The Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex departs from Seattle’s Pier 90 to return home after participating in Seattle Seafair Fleet Week 2014. Fleet Weeks are a collection of events celebrating America’s maritime defense arm of the military held each year in large U.S. cities. They provide an opportunity for the American public to meet their Navy and to experience the best of the sea services.
  • Camera: Nikon D4
  • Apeture: f/22
  • Exposure: 1/200th
  • Focal: 85mm

americasnavy:

Around the World Wednesday: The Wasp-class amphibious assault ship USS Essex departs from Seattle’s Pier 90 to return home after participating in Seattle Seafair Fleet Week 2014. Fleet Weeks are a collection of events celebrating America’s maritime defense arm of the military held each year in large U.S. cities. They provide an opportunity for the American public to meet their Navy and to experience the best of the sea services.

Newest Amphibious Warship Continues Along Route to Homeport
The U.S. Navy’s newest amphibious warship USS America (LHA 6) arrived in Valparaiso, Chile for her fifth port visit on her maiden transit, en route to her homeport in San Diego, California.
During the visit, Sailors and Marines assigned to the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force (SPMAGTF) South will conduct bilateral exercises with the Chilean Navy.  America will also offer ship tours and host Chilean guests and distinguished officials aboard the ship, working to strengthen partnerships within the 4th Fleet area of responsibility.
While successfully working to strengthen relationships with South American allies, USS America is also preparing for the arrival of the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.
USS America, the first in a series of 11 planned America-class amphibs, is built with more deck space than previous ships of its kind in order to accommodate a range of aircraft — including MV-22 Ospreys and the F-35B Short-Take-Off-and-Landing Joint Strike Fighter.
The ship is currently transiting around the coast of South America conducting joint training exercises with a host of key allies and embarked U.S. Marine units that immediately began amphibious operations, only days after departing Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi.
Prior to arriving in Chile, USS America transited the Strait of Magellan, where Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus embarked the ship, and made port visits in Brazil, Cuba, and Colombia. 
Read more about America’s port visit in Chile: http://1.usa.gov/1qprIE5

Read more about America’s F-35B aviation capabilities: http://bit.ly/1leJtGb

Newest Amphibious Warship Continues Along Route to Homeport

The U.S. Navy’s newest amphibious warship USS America (LHA 6) arrived in Valparaiso, Chile for her fifth port visit on her maiden transit, en route to her homeport in San Diego, California.

During the visit, Sailors and Marines assigned to the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force (SPMAGTF) South will conduct bilateral exercises with the Chilean Navy.  America will also offer ship tours and host Chilean guests and distinguished officials aboard the ship, working to strengthen partnerships within the 4th Fleet area of responsibility.

While successfully working to strengthen relationships with South American allies, USS America is also preparing for the arrival of the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter aircraft.

USS America, the first in a series of 11 planned America-class amphibs, is built with more deck space than previous ships of its kind in order to accommodate a range of aircraft — including MV-22 Ospreys and the F-35B Short-Take-Off-and-Landing Joint Strike Fighter.

The ship is currently transiting around the coast of South America conducting joint training exercises with a host of key allies and embarked U.S. Marine units that immediately began amphibious operations, only days after departing Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, Mississippi.

Prior to arriving in Chile, USS America transited the Strait of Magellan, where Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus embarked the ship, and made port visits in Brazil, Cuba, and Colombia

Read more about America’s port visit in Chile: http://1.usa.gov/1qprIE5

Read more about America’s F-35B aviation capabilities: http://bit.ly/1leJtGb

Amphibious Warships: “Swiss Army Knife” of the U.S. Navy Fleet
In December 2013, the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, General James Amos referred to San Antonio-class amphibious warships as the “Swiss Army Knife” of all naval ships, highlighting the ships’ unique capabilities which allow them to successfully carry out humanitarian and combatant missions anywhere in the world and on short notice.
The Amphibious Warship Industrial Base Coalition (AWIBC) produced an infographic, inspired by the remarks from General Amos, illustrating why U.S. Navy amphibious warships are the “Swiss Army Knife” of the U.S. Navy’s fleet. Each blade of the “Swiss Army Knife” represents a unique capability that makes amphibious warships the “most utilitarian” of U.S. Navy warships and vital to the U.S. Navy fleet.
Amphibious warships have unique capabilities vital to the success of the U.S. Navy-Marine Corps team’s mission. Specifically engineered to sail into harm’s way, U.S. Navy amphibious warships are built for survivability, with electric and mechanical systems that are shock hardened for blast survivability. These warships have the facilities on board to store and perform the necessary maintenance on helicopters and aircraft, such as the MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft.
Amphibious warships have wide band secure satellite communications, which gives them command and control capabilities, allowing them to embark an amphibious squadron or expeditionary strike group for a wide range of missions.
See the full infographic here: http://bit.ly/1pFppMS

Amphibious Warships: “Swiss Army Knife” of the U.S. Navy Fleet

In December 2013, the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, General James Amos referred to San Antonio-class amphibious warships as the “Swiss Army Knife” of all naval ships, highlighting the ships’ unique capabilities which allow them to successfully carry out humanitarian and combatant missions anywhere in the world and on short notice.

The Amphibious Warship Industrial Base Coalition (AWIBC) produced an infographic, inspired by the remarks from General Amos, illustrating why U.S. Navy amphibious warships are the “Swiss Army Knife” of the U.S. Navy’s fleet. Each blade of the “Swiss Army Knife” represents a unique capability that makes amphibious warships the “most utilitarian” of U.S. Navy warships and vital to the U.S. Navy fleet.

Amphibious warships have unique capabilities vital to the success of the U.S. Navy-Marine Corps team’s mission. Specifically engineered to sail into harm’s way, U.S. Navy amphibious warships are built for survivability, with electric and mechanical systems that are shock hardened for blast survivability. These warships have the facilities on board to store and perform the necessary maintenance on helicopters and aircraft, such as the MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft.

Amphibious warships have wide band secure satellite communications, which gives them command and control capabilities, allowing them to embark an amphibious squadron or expeditionary strike group for a wide range of missions.

See the full infographic here: http://bit.ly/1pFppMS